Book Review: The King’s Scroll

The King's Scrolls Tour BannerWhen Jaye offered a review copy of The King’s Scrolls for the blog tour, I wanted to participate, but knew I probably wouldn’t have time to read it between the time I got it and now. So my brother volunteered to give it a read and share his thoughts. Here’s what he has to say.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000040_00020]The King’s Scrolls continues the adventure of Kyrin, Jace and their friends. Arcacia is rapidly becoming a dangerous place for a follower of Elom to live. Kyrin and Jace struggle to protect their loved ones from the emperor and his men as they attempt to preserve the last complete copy of the King’s scrolls (aka, the Bible). The stakes raise as they are forced to choose between the two things they care about most.

This country mirrors, in a fantasy world, the path our own country is following. Just as the US was founded upon Christianity, Arcacia has been faithful to Elom, but in recent years leaders have plunged Arcacia into spiritual darkness. This book challenged me (Jon) to think about what my reaction would be if the US follows (or continues to follow) the same course. How much am I willing to give for my faith? This book is very clean, but due to intense situations would probably be best for young teenagers and up.

Thanks Jonathan for doing the review for us today! What do the rest of you think of this book? For those who have read it, what did you think of it? If you haven’t read it, does it sound like the sort of book you want to get your hands on?

Book Review: Machiavellian

MachiavellianBetween the release of Counted Worthy, working on a new book, and the holiday season, my reading progress has been reduced to a crawl. You’ve probably noticed that the book reviews have been lacking the past few weeks. But, I finally finished something! J. Grace Pennington was kind enough to give me a free copy of her latest release in exchange for an honest review. So here it is.

In this book, Andi’s sympathies from the previous book are dragged into another adventure. When the Surveyor picks up some extra passengers, the get more than they bargained for. The trouble is, the heroes and villains seem as entangled and undecipherable as the motives and goals. As the line between right and wrong seems to blur, Andi struggles to discover the truth before more people get hurt.

This story leaves the humanistic tendencies of science fiction no where to be seen and quite un-missed. The Christian worldviews and morals of the author and her characters weave into the story without ever becoming preachy. This series keeps getting better along with the author’s improving writing prowess. I can’t wait to see what will come next.

Book Review: In His Image

In His Image

I looked at his face, for the first time feeling a sense of common humanity with him. Before I had subconsciously been thinking of the inhabitants as different from us, somehow not truly human, whatever their biological makeup might be. But that was wrong. This young man had a life just as real as mine; a heart, a mind, and emotions, as genuine as my own.

It’s so fun to see authors’ works improving as they continue to write. Several people told me that In His Image was way better than Radialloy and they were so right. I liked Radialloy, but it took me a while to get into it and I found it a little difficult to follow at times. No such problem here.

Andi and her adoptive father work the sickbay on board a space craft that searches for extra-terrestrial life. As Christians, neither Andi, her dad, or her cousin Crash believe in such a thing. After all, people are uniquely created in the image of God. Right? When the team experiences a rocky landing on an exploratory trip to a new planet, all of them are shocked to find themselves pulled into a colony of people. How did the civilization get there? Are they aliens or humans? And what should the crew of the Surveyor do about them?

The characterization in this books was fantastic. I could sense Andi being stretched and growing as a person. Elasson came to life even though he had limited dialogue due to speaking a different language. There were some tantalizing hints dropped about Crash’s past. Plus some pretty neat developments with August.

For those of you who might raise your eyebrows at the fictional discovery of extra-terrestrial life, it’s handled well. Promise. A totally Biblical worldview and explanation spiced with the age-old author game of, “What if?”

P.S. I read this on my kindle, therefore I can lend it to someone. Who wants to borrow the Kindle copy of this book? If you’d like to be considered, leave a comment saying so!

Me getting ready to read last night.

Me getting ready to read last night.

Book Review and Giveaway: Radialloy

This week I’ll be reviewing Radialloy and doing a slightly unorthodox givewaway. But before we get to that, let’s find out who won last week’s giveaway. (Cue drum-roll.) The winner is…

Morgan Huneke

Congratulations, Morgan! I hope you enjoy the book. I’ll be sending you an email asking for your mailing address so I can get that to you. Now for this week’s review.

Radialloy

The scream woke me up. He wasn’t fighting them to win. He was fighting them to give me a chance to get away.

Andi Lloyd enjoys her life aboard the surveyor, a class-A vessel that travels through outer space. She works alongside the Doctor, her adopted father. When her swashbuckling cousin, Eagle Crash, comes aboard with warnings of imminent danger, Andi doesn’t know what to make of it. Most of the trouble seems to be coming from Crash’s arrogance. Unfortunately, the problems don’t leave with him.

It took me a while to get really engrossed in this story, but that’s probably because I’m not used to sci-fi. It took J. Grace Pennington a while to set up the conflict that drives the second half of the book. Once I reached the tipping point and everything started coming together and making sense, I couldn’t stop reading. It was pretty intense. I’d tell you more, but a lot of the suspense comes from not knowing what’s going on, so I won’t ruin that for you..

Radialloy is a unique story about loyalty, trust, and family.

Giveaway

This week the giveaway is NOT limited to residents of the continental United States. You folks living in different countries are welcome to enter. The only limitation this time is that you need to either have a kindle or the free kindle reader for PC. The giveaway is unconventional because I’m not actually giving away a copy of the book. Because I own a kindle copy of Radialloy, I can lend that copy to someone for a two week period. So, the winner of the giveaway will get to borrow Radialloy for two weeks.

Last week it was so much fun to read your reasons for following Leah’s Bookshelf. This week I’d like to know what other websites you use to find good books (Goodreads, other book blogs, etc.). As usual, simply leave a comment answering this question and you’ll be entered in the giveaway.

What sites (besides Leah’s Bookshelf) do you use to find good book recommendations (Goodreads, other book blogs, book review sites)?

Book Review: Never

Never

“Listen to me, kid. It don’t matter what happens. It don’t matter what anybody thinks or does. All that matters is that you keep fightin’ and never, you hear me? never give up.”

I think this is the first time I’ve given a self-published book a five star rating. I found “Never” through a blog scavenger hunt the author did to celebrate the book release. When I downloaded the free sample, I didn’t know what to expect. The sample definitely hooked me.

Travis Hamilton, a scholarly young man, is an unlikely suspect for murder. When he is convicted and sentenced ten years labor in Dead Mines, his brother Ross is determined to clear Travis. Ross knows his brother cannot survive the sentence, and he knows Travis is not the murderer. But the web of deception is more tangled than either brother imagined. As their journeys increase in difficulty, both brothers turn to moral convictions that must “never” be abandoned, no matter what the cost. Can Travis survive the evil rule of the mine boss? Can Ross reach the bottom of an ever deepening mystery before it’s too late to rescue his brother?

Some of Travis’s experiences in the mine might make this book unsuitable for young children. If it was a movie I’d give it a PG rating. That said, this story was refreshing. Even in Christian fiction, it’s rare to see heroes sticking to what they believe as tenaciously as Ross and Travis. The author did a wonderful job showing principled good winning over unprincipled evil. I’ll be looking forward to reading more from this author.

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a honest review. All opinions expressed are my own.

Author: J Grace Pennington
Audience: Tween–YA
Genre: Historical Adventure
Pages: 318
Publisher: Self-Published

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