Book Review: The Way of Kings

Strength does not make one capable of rule; it makes one capable of service. -pg 831

The Way of Kings brings David and Goliath odds to a whole new level. I’m not sure I’ve ever encountered a story where the little guy got stepped on so many times and or the superior force of the bad guys been so complete. To make matters more difficult, the little guy is not only fighting ridiculous odds, he’s also fighting to define and embrace his own honor and humanity in a world of white washed sepulchers.

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New and Upcoming Books I’m Excited For

We all have favorite authors we follow closely, anticipating their new book releases. It’s especially exciting when a new book in a series releases, and you can finally get resolution to the cliff hanger at the end of the previous book–or, if there was no cliff hanger, spend more time with your favorite characters. I thought it would be fun to share four of the books I’m looking forward to this fall.


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Abigail: There is a God

On October 26, 1967 Martin Luther King, Jr. stood before a group of students in Philadelphia and gave a speech that became known as “The Street Sweeper Speech.” He encouraged the young people to tackle their life’s work with gusto.

If it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures, sweep streets like Beethoven composed music, sweep streets like Leontyne Price sings before the Metropolitan Opera. Sweep streets like Shakespeare wrote poetry. Sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will have to pause and say: Here lived a great street sweeper who swept his job well. —What Is Your Life’s Blueprint?

In Lois T. Henderson’s novel Abigail, the young heroine takes MLK’s message a step further. Faced with an inescapable betrothal to drunken Nabal, Abigail resolves to be a good wife but not with the goal of earning respect for herself. Instead she tells herself,

“I will be a good wife that all the earth will know there is a God in Israel.”


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Author Interview with Chuck Black

Every time Chuck Black comes out with a new novel, my brother and I don’t waste time purchasing it! Since all my blogging time this week has gone to working on the new site, I thought it would be fun to re-enjoy this interview from 2012.


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An Update

Hello friends! I can’t believe it’s been a month since I last wrote a post for you guys. It’s been a month of big changes for me and my family. My last post was written right after returning from my first experience as a camp counselor. What I didn’t say in that post was that my grandfather had a heart attack during the last day we were at camp. I wrote that post in a hospital waiting room.

For a few days following triple bypass surgery, we thought Papa would pull through. However, he didn’t. After two weeks of spending our days in the hospital, we launched into the flurry of activity that surrounds the execution of a funeral.


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4 Non-Fiction Books to Read Before a Missions Trip

Have you ever considered going on a missions trip? The opportunity to travel for missions usually presents itself to Christin youth sooner or later. Sometimes it involves a flight that crosses continents. Sometimes it’s a road trip to a location in your own country. Often there are a lot of questions you ask yourself before making a commitment to a missions trip. What can I really do? I’m not an evangelist, how am I supposed to tell strangers about God? I’ve lived a sheltered life and don’t even understand the issues a missions trip might address. Will my participation really help?

4 Missions Trips Books

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Leith: Loved by the Father

“My own father didn’t want me. What makes you think God would be any different?”

Though only eighteen, Leith has seen more of the world’s darkness than most grandfathers. When pinpricks of light begin to seep into his world, he reacts the only way he knows how–disbelief.

Loved by the Father

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Book Review: The King’s Shadow

King's Shadow, The

“You, Shadow!” the slave master shouted, as though Evyn were deaf as well as dumb. Laughter erupted behind him. “Shadow” was what they called dogs or horses. Evyn burned with shame. Uncle Morgan had even stolen his name.

Young Evyn is a Welsh serf in the 11th century. His life is turned upside down when his uncle betrays him and his father, leaving his father dead and Evyn a mute orphan. The uncle then sells Evyn into a life of slavery and pockets the money to repay a debt. Evyn becomes Shadow, a often mistreated and sometimes pitied slave boy. But his fortunes begin to change when he learns to read and write. He becomes a squire to Earl Harold and in time, the two become close friends. When Harold is crowned king, he makes Evyn his foster son. It’s a bond that will throw Evyn into the middle of two of the greatest battles of his time.

It’s funny how some books fade from your memory within a week of reading them, while some linger for years. The King’s Shadow is one that has lingered. I read it in 2008, yet I still remember feeling furious at Uncle Morgan and deeply sympathetic towards Evyn.

What’s your favorite time period to read about? Do you like any other books set in the 11th century?

Reposted from March 28, 2014