Book Release: Savior Like a Shepherd

Have you ever wondered what it was like for orphans born in the Wild West? Faith Blum has a new book that explores the life of three orphans born during that time. Today’s post will tell you a little about Faith and her book, Savior, Like a Shepherd. Make sure you read to the end to see the super fun giveaway she has going on, too!

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Book Review: My Soul To Keep

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I learned to be happy with the small triumph of a good day. –pg 44

My brother took one look at the front cover of this book and decided it must fit into the sappy category of novels. While it did remind me of Kingsbury’s Firstborn Series in a lot of ways, it wasn’t the sappy sort of love story you’d expect from a novel about a down-and-out movie star cautiously re-entering the world of film. Bunn chose to focus on the nuts and bolts of movie making, the cutthroat world of Hollywood, and the personal journey of people learning to trust God with the scars from their pasts.

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Pro-Life Stories

After my November post about Fiction & The Sanctity of Life, we all agreed that we like stories that embrace a message of hope and faith. Today I want to share a few pro-life stories that I’ve enjoyed. These books didn’t necessarily set out to promote a pro-life message, but they show what it looks like to value life and fight for hope.

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Words of Radiance: When Right Makes Might … Literally

What would happen if concepts could take near-tangible form and bond with people to lend chosen individuals extra strength and skill? That is exactly what happens in the fantasy world Sanderson weaves for The Stormlight Archives. Spren are the visible representations of concepts like fear, pain, and glory. (In Narnia, Dryads and Naiads are the spirits of trees and water that can take physical form. Spren are similar, but represent intangibles instead of elements of nature.)

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Book Review: The Way of Kings

Strength does not make one capable of rule; it makes one capable of service. -pg 831

The Way of Kings brings David and Goliath odds to a whole new level. I’m not sure I’ve ever encountered a story where the little guy got stepped on so many times and or the superior force of the bad guys been so complete. To make matters more difficult, the little guy is not only fighting ridiculous odds, he’s also fighting to define and embrace his own honor and humanity in a world of white washed sepulchers.

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4 Non-Fiction Books to Read Before a Missions Trip

Have you ever considered going on a missions trip? The opportunity to travel for missions usually presents itself to Christin youth sooner or later. Sometimes it involves a flight that crosses continents. Sometimes it’s a road trip to a location in your own country. Often there are a lot of questions you ask yourself before making a commitment to a missions trip. What can I really do? I’m not an evangelist, how am I supposed to tell strangers about God? I’ve lived a sheltered life and don’t even understand the issues a missions trip might address. Will my participation really help?

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Leith: Loved by the Father

“My own father didn’t want me. What makes you think God would be any different?”

Though only eighteen, Leith has seen more of the world’s darkness than most grandfathers. When pinpricks of light begin to seep into his world, he reacts the only way he knows how–disbelief.

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Book Review: The King’s Shadow

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“You, Shadow!” the slave master shouted, as though Evyn were deaf as well as dumb. Laughter erupted behind him. “Shadow” was what they called dogs or horses. Evyn burned with shame. Uncle Morgan had even stolen his name.

Young Evyn is a Welsh serf in the 11th century. His life is turned upside down when his uncle betrays him and his father, leaving his father dead and Evyn a mute orphan. The uncle then sells Evyn into a life of slavery and pockets the money to repay a debt. Evyn becomes Shadow, a often mistreated and sometimes pitied slave boy. But his fortunes begin to change when he learns to read and write. He becomes a squire to Earl Harold and in time, the two become close friends. When Harold is crowned king, he makes Evyn his foster son. It’s a bond that will throw Evyn into the middle of two of the greatest battles of his time.

It’s funny how some books fade from your memory within a week of reading them, while some linger for years. The King’s Shadow is one that has lingered. I read it in 2008, yet I still remember feeling furious at Uncle Morgan and deeply sympathetic towards Evyn.

What’s your favorite time period to read about? Do you like any other books set in the 11th century?

Reposted from March 28, 2014