Book Review: Gunner’s Run

“Pilot to gunners. Keep your eyes open. We’re almost to target. By now every German fighter in the area knows where to find us.”

I pressed the intercom button to respond to Lt. Conover. “Bring ’em on. We’re ready.”

Nineteen year old Jim Yoder has his life under control until he ends up a fugitive in Hitler’s third Reich. As he journeys across Europe Jim encounters other fugitives, traitors and resistance fighters. Will he make it home to tell his father and the girl he loves that he trusts God?

I have read this book three times. Once on my own, and twice out loud. I started reading it to my dad while we were on vacation, but we didn’t finish till we got home. Then I had to start it again because my mom and brother wanted to know what happened before the part they heard! Everyone enjoyed it, and I highly recommend Gunner’s Run.

Audience: 10 and up

Make sure you come back on Wednesday for an interview with Rick Barry, author of Gunner’s Run.

Book Review: Twenty and Ten

The Nazis are looking for those children,” said Sister Gabriel. “If we take them we must never let on that they are here. Never. Even if we are questioned. We can never betray them, no matter what they do to us. Do you understand?”

Janet and the 19 other boys and girls from her fifth-grade class have been sent to the French countryside for safekeeping during the Nazi occupation. None of them hesitate to agree when a tired man arrives in search of safety for 10 Jewish children.

“They’re coming! They’re coming!” she yelled. And suddenly Philip and George were also among us, panting. “They’re coming! They’re coming! The Nazis are coming!”

No one expects Nazi soldier’s to arrive while Sister Gabriel is away in town, but when they are spotted in the valley, the children must make a plan and execute it quickly. Will it be enough to keep them all safe?

Audience: Any age, either to be read independently or listen to. Target audience is probably 8 to 12.

Book Review: A Father’s Promise

Rudi Kaplan is a young Christian Jew living in Warsaw. When the Nazi army invades his city, life grows increasingly difficult. When things are tough, though, Rudi knows he can depend on his father. That is, until his father tells him he must leave.

“I can’t–I just can’t go alone.”

But he must.

“The forest is God’s secret place for you, Rudi. There–there you shall be under His shadow, where you will be safe. Please, son, please don’t let me down.”

A place of safety. As Rudi obeys his father, he is painfully aware that his father has not made the same promise concerning himself. As he struggles to survive the war, Rudi must learn to trust his heavenly father as well as his earthly one.

He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

Audience: 11 and up, or family read-aloud