Today Is the Day! Counted Worthy Release

CW_Cover MediumCounted Worthy hit the shelves this morning! You can buy it at…

If you’ve already read it, please consider leaving a review on Amazon. Amazon reviews are very important, especially to self-published authors. If you want to help out even more, consider:

  • Asking your library to purchase a copy
  • Posting a video review to YouTube
  • Tweeting, Facebooking, Pinning, etc. about Counted Worthy
  • Writing a blog post about Counted Worthy
  • Adding Counted Worthy to an Amazon Listmania or Goodreads Listopia list.
  • Attend and invite others to attend the Facebook Launch Party next Monday.

If you implement any of these ideas (or come up with ideas of your own) let me know and I’ll be sure to give you Story Shop points.

Release Day Fun

I’m not the only one celebrating today. Check out the release day fun going elsewhere in the blogosphere and beyond.

Dreaming Hobbit: Author Interview
Ivory Palace: Author Interview
Writing to Inspire: Author Interview
The Rebelution Facebook Announcement
Christian Bookshelf Review: Interview and Giveaway

Praise for Counted Worthy

CW_Mockup Medium Only three days left until the Counted Worthy release date! Last night I ordered copies for everyone who contributed to the Kickstarter campaign, and I’ve been working on some author interviews for the blog tour. Speaking of the blog tour, Christian Bookshelf Review featured an author interview and book giveaway.

It’s been exciting to share Counted Worthy with some beta readers over the past few weeks and get their feedback. Here’s what they’ve had to say.

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Every generation must discover its own storyweavers. Leah Good is one of ours and we are fortunate. Counted Worthy is a thrilling work of inspirational fiction that perfectly complements the message of Do Hard Things. Grab a copy for yourself, grab a copy for a friend, and help spread the word about this phenomenal debut. Counted Worthy belongs in the hands of every Christian teen and story lover in the country. It’s that good. –Brett Harris, bestselling author of Do Hard Things

This is a timely novel during a year that international persecution of Christians has regularly made headlines. –Woody Robertson, co-founder of CollegePlus

 Page-turning, tersely written dystopia about the power of words and the ultimate power of THE Word. A great first novel from an author I hope we’ll see more of. —Rachel Starr Thomson, author of The Oneness Cycle, The Seventh World Trilogy, and other novels

Story Quote_Counted Worthy
Story Quote_Counted Worthy

Counted Worthy is quite possibly the best contemporary Christian fiction I’ve ever read. The strong, beautiful message is clearly conveyed without the slightest bit of preaching; something exceedingly rare in today’s Christian market. The premise, both unique and familiar, shines like a candle in the dark, forcing you to re-evaluate just how far you’d go with your faith. Ultimately, it instills a desire to follow God to the end of this world. Eagerly awaiting Miss Good’s next novel! –Catsi E, reader

 Radical. Intense. Compelling. Leah Good’s dystopian novel, Counted Worthy, powerfully embodies the message that today’s young people need to hear: the Reason we have to die to self, pursue the impossible, and when all else fails, to stand. This is the message that has the potential to turn a generation of complacency into a generation of inspiration. –Melody van Achterberg, reader

 Intense. Even if you’re not religious, you can still find appreciation, inspiration, and will wait in anticipation reading this novel. –R. Stars, reader

Counted Worthy: Cover Reveal

ebook_cover I have been eagerly anticipating this day ever since I made the decision to self-publish Counted Worthy. So, readers, I’m pleased to introduce you to the official cover of Counted Worthy. And to make things better, it’s now available for pre-order!

Thanks so much to all of you who have encouraged me along the way, supported this project through Kickstarter, and joined the team of beta readers and editors. I appreciate every single person who is reading this post.

For those of you who enjoy building up Story Shop points, sharing this post is worth three points instead of the normal one point for post shares. Please share this post on your social media accounts and send me the links so I can award you points.

Please check out all the details below! And let me know if I missed any details. My baby is finally making it’s debut. 😀


Synopsis

Heather Stone lives in fear of repeating the past, yet she continues doing the one thing that could trigger another disaster. When the police trace an illegal Bible to her house, Heather’s world begins to crumble.

Her father’s life hangs in the balance. No one with the power to help knows or cares. If she tries to save him, she could lead her friends to their deaths. If she does nothing, her father’s fate is certain. Can she evade a hostile police force and win public sympathy before it’s too late?


Pre-Order

Get the paperback or Kindle e-book.

Check out the special Counted Worthy page for more details!


Sneak Peek

Want to get a look at the first chapter of Counted Worthy? Wait no longer.

Read Chapter One

Kickstarter Update

support_counted_worthyHello Everyone! I want to thank all of you who have pledged to and shared the link to the Counted Worthy Kickstarter campaign. Last Monday was absolutely incredible. After launching the campaign and posting about it on social media, The Rebelution blog also hosted a post about the campaign. Over the next 12 hours, $750 of pledges came pouring in. The campaign reached it’s base goal of $1,000 within three days.

Today the Kickstarter page shows $1,540 in pledges and 69 hours (a little under 3 days) to go. I would love your help in reaching the stretch goal of $2,000. At this point, all pledges are locked in. This means that if you pledge, you’ll definitely pay the money you pledged and you’ll definitely receive  the reward you chose. This means that supporting the campaign is a great way to pre-order a copy of Counted Worthy.

For a pledge of $10 you’ll receive an e-copy of Counted Worthy. A $15 pledge gets you a paperback. And a $20 pledge gets you a signed paperback.

Please continue to share the campaign with your friends. We have 69 hours to raise $460. Every email, Facebook share, tweet, and pin make a difference in reaching the stretch goal.

Tweeting Made Easy

The #CountedWorthy Kickstarter ends in 69 hours. Pledge now to help reach the stretch goal of $2,000. Click to Tweet

Pre-order your copy of #CountedWorthy by pledging to the Kickstarter. Act soon. Only 3 days left. Click to Tweet

Check it Out! Stories for God’s Glory with New Vendor

Stories for God's Glory-Adventure My long time readers may remember reading about Stories for God’s Glory (SfGG) in the past. For newer readers, SfGG is a writing curriculum I authored. It’s designed to teach Jr. High students how to write quality fiction (you can learn more here –> StoriesForGodsGlory.com). It’s been carried by Schoolhouse Publisher for a few years now, and I’ve taken it to two homeschool conventions myself. Now I’m excited to announce that another vendor is carrying the curriculum!

Stories for God’s Glory
carried by
Finding Christ Through Fiction

Finding Christ Through Fiction is both an online store and homeschool convention vendor. Please check out SfGG on their website and share the news with your friends!

Author Interview: Hannah Mills

Hannah MillsHi everyone! Sorry to be a bit late with today’s post. I had a lot of school to do and didn’t turn on the computer because I didn’t want to get distracted. Anyway, here’s an interview with author Hannah Mills, who also happens to be a good friend of mine. Enjoy!

What gave you the idea for Plague of Darkness?
The idea came from the character of Teague. I liked him so much that before I was even halfway through “Called”, I decided that I simply had to explore Teague’s backstory and give him his own book.

What was the hardest part of writing this book?
Honestly, I think the most difficult part about the writing of this book was keeping it consistent with what he shared of his past in Called. If you can avoid writing books out-of-order, do! It’s a lot harder than one would realize.

What is one personal lesson you learned from writing this book?
Strength of will. I’ve always been a stubborn person, but Teague has a stronger will than I do, and helped me realize how strong and resilient one can be under incredible pressures.

What have been the pros and cons of self-publishing?
The biggest pro has been getting to do my own cover designs. The cons are that right now, I don’t have the know-how or time to really market my books.

Are you working on any new books?
Yes! I am currently working on Hosanna House, a contemporary novel. It’s going through a lot of editing after placing 2nd in a novel contest. I’m really excited about it, and can’t wait to share it with the world.

Is there anything else you would like to share with readers?
Readers, have high standards. Don’t settle for poor writing. Some amazing books are out there, and well worth your time. Writers, keep reading– and read high quality fiction and non-fiction. If you are not a good reader, chances are you won’t be a good writer. And also, be patient with yourself. It’s neat to look back at my old writings and see how much I’ve improved. It just takes time, practice, and a willingness to learn.

Thanks for the interview Hannah!

Author Interview: Molly Evangeline

Molly EvangelineLast Friday I reviewed The Pirate Daughter’s Promise. If you haven’t already done so, go comment on that post for your chance to win a free copy of the book. Today, author Molly Evangeline is here for an interview. Please join me in welcoming her.

What gave you the idea for The Pirate Daughter’s Promise?
All I used to write were horse stories until I saw The Fellowship of the Ring as a teenager. That was the first step that started me in the direction of writing action/adventure type stories. A year later, I saw the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie for my fifteenth birthday and fell in love with the idea of pirates and sailing. The plot for The Pirate Daughter’s Promise developed shortly after that.

How long did it take for you to write this book?
I wrote the first three or four chapters as the story was developing, but hit a snag and set it aside for about three years. My love for pirate stories resurfaced again with the second Pirates of the Caribbean movie so I pulled the story back out. Once I got into it, I wrote the remaining chapters in about two and a half weeks.

Tell us about your self-publishing experience. What has been the best and hardest thing about self-publishing?
It took a long time to really settle into self/indie publishing. When I first chose to self-publish The Pirate Daughter’s Promise it was because I had no idea how to get into traditional publishing and I was impatient. Now it’s a decided choice, and I don’t think I’d ever choose traditional publishing even if it was offered to me. The best thing about it is the control and the potential to actually make a living off it. I am a very do-it-yourself type of person. I typically spend over a year actually writing a book, and when I put that much effort into something, I want to see it to the end so I know I’ll be 100% happy with it. And the fact is, if you’re trying to do this as your job, indie publishing is much more profitable than traditional publishing, but it all depends on your ability to market and sell books. That’s where the hardest part comes in. Marketing is something you have to work very hard at, especially if it’s not something you’re good at. It takes a lot of time and effort that you would much rather spend on the actual writing process. But, if you’re doing what you love, it’s all worth it in the end.

What person has influenced your writing the most?
Definitely my mom. She is a writer too, and if she had not been writing while I was young, I may never have tried it myself. It was also her decision to homeschool me that played a huge part in where I am now. All that extra time I had to devote to writing, and imagining, and improving my skills was invaluable. A homeschool lifestyle also gave me the DIY attitude I needed to pursue self-publishing and setting up my own indie publishing company. I also have to point to J.R.R. Tolkien as the second most influential person in my writing. Discovering The Lord of the Rings when I was thirteen was a turning point for me. That’s the first time I realized writing was what I wanted to do with my life, and his stories still have a huge effect on what I like to write today.

Are you working on any new stories?
I am right in the middle of writing a new young adult fantasy series called Ilyon Chronicles. It’s the biggest project I’ve ever undertaken. It will be six books (unless something drastic happens along the way and a seventh book pops up). I started the first book, which turned out to be the longest book I’ve ever written, in June 2011, and I am now just about finished with book two. It’s set in a medieval/ancient Rome type setting with a tyrannical government and dealing with some issues we have now in modern society, so it’s full of action/adventure as well as many spiritual, emotional, and physical struggles. I’ve never been so close to or related so much to my characters as I have this group. I’m only a third of the way through the series and I’ve already laughed and cried and experienced incredible highs and lows with them.

Is there anything else you would like to share with readers?
I am beyond excited to share Ilyon Chronicles. I have a ton of work to do before that can happen, but every day I’m working hard to get there. There’s something special about this story. The things God has been showing me and the way He’s guiding me through all the little details is amazing. This story is so far above anything I’ve ever done before, and I can hardly wait to see what readers think and what God does with it. I’ve already set up a website for it, http://www.ilyonchronicles.com, and have an active Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/ilyonchronicles. I try to keep it updated often with where I am in writing the series, and occasionally post little snippets of the story.

Thanks for the interview, Molly! Readers, do you have thoughts or questions about anything Molly said?

Author Interview: Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Why did you choose tell “Jefferson’s Sons” through the eyes of three characters?
This was mostly a decision based on structure. As I did the research for this book, the time frame kept expanding. I could see how the world in which Beverly spent his early years, at Monticello during the relative stillness of Jefferson’s Presidency, was very different from that in which Maddy grew up, after Jefferson’s retirement, when visitors flocked to the farm. I wanted to contrast those differences. But I also really, really, wanted to tell what I saw as the natural end of the story–that horrifying auction after Jefferson’s death–and, by that point, Beverly is long gone, and Maddy fully grown. Peter Fossett actually left a written account of his childhood at Monticello, a terrific first-person source for those final years. To start where I wanted to start, I had to be in Beverly’s voice–he’s really the only one old enough to carry the story–and at the end, I had to be in Peter’s voice, as he’s the only one left.

Theoretically I could have stayed with just those two, but there’s another problem: I wanted this book to reach middle school audiences. To do that, I have to keep a certain level of innocence in the discourse. Some of the topics we cover would be viewed and discussed very differently by adult narrators, and the minute I slide into an adult point-of-view I run the danger of losing of either being untruthful to the history, or writing something inappropriate for a fifth-grader to read. When I split the narrative three ways, so that each voice begins at around age 7 and continues into early teens (a bit younger for Peter), I could cover the ground I wanted to cover, and still write the book I wanted to write.

Please note that if this hadn’t been based so strongly on historical facts I wouldn’t have done it this way. If it were straight fiction–I was making all this up–I’d have used one narrator and a much shorter time frame. Easier on everyone. But the biggest strength of the book is that is very much based on fact.

Do you have a favorite scene in this book?
Hmm. I’d have to go with the ending–very hard to write, and it’s certainly not the happiest scene, but I was really pleased with how I got it in the end. I think it has a rhythm that suits the action.

What was one of the most unexpected facts or stories you uncovered while researching for “Jefferson’s Sons”?
There are simply tons of good stories, many of which couldn’t make it into the book. For example, Joe Fossett’s older brother Daniel, who is very briefly mentioned as having been sold away why Joe was a small boy, actually bought Wormley Hughes at the auction. He bought him for a dollar and gave him his freedom. Where Daniel had been living and how he gained his own freedom are completely unknown–from a historical point of view, he appears, then disappears again.

Part way through my research, the historians at Monticello found evidence that Patsy Fossett gained her freedom as an adult–she comes up in Census records in 1830, in Cincinnati, which is where many of the Fossetts were living, including Joe and Edith. Prior to a few years ago, she was “lost” from a historical point of view–no one knew what had happened to her.

Do you have plans for another historical fiction?
I’m in the middle of a book set in England during World War II. It features wholly fictional characters, more like my book Weaver’s Daughter than Jefferson’s Sons.

What advice would you give to a person trying to become a fiction writer?
Read everything you can. Especially read writers you admire. Write, but don’t be too eager for publication–publication is really hard, and rejection is really discouraging, and at the start you just need to write for yourself, nobody else. Forget “write what you know.” Write what you want to read.

Is there anything else you would like to share with readers?
I’m really pleased at how many people are reading and responding to Jefferson’s Sons. It’s been a really good journey. Thanks for inviting me onto your blog, and for caring about my book.

Thank you for joining us on this blog! I’m looking forward to reading your new books in the future.

Visit Kimberly Brubaker Bradley’s Website
Read More Author Interviews