Of Betsie ten Boom

Betsie_Ten_Boom Joy C. recently asked me to do a guest post over on her blog, Fullness of Joy. The post (which is about Betsie ten Boom) went live on Tuesday so I thought I’d share it with you.

If God shows us bad times ahead, it’s enough for me that he knows about them, that’s why he sometimes shows us things you know—to tell us that this too is in his hands. ~Betsie ten Boom

The other day, I started thinking about Betsie ten Boom. Even now that WWII has become part of history, Corrie ten Boom remains a household name for Christian families. I bet most of you reading this have read, watched, or listened to The Hiding Place. Maybe you’ve even done all three or read some of Corrie’s other books like Tramp for the Lord. But back to Betsie.

Because she didn’t survive the war, or write books, or have a movie made about her life, Betsie is often remembered only as “Corrie ten Boom’s sister,” but I think she deserves more recognition.

Read the rest of this article over at Fullness of Joy

Slang of the 1800s

Everyday Life in the 1800sIn every time period there are slang words. If you’re a writer and your story takes place 150 years ago (like one of mine does) it is important to know what words people were saying back then. In addition to being important for writers, the slang of yesteryear can be the “beatingest” fun. Here is a sampling of words used in the 1800s.

Acknowledge the corn: to admit the truth

Allow: to admit; to be of the opinion

Balderdash: nonsense; empty babble

Beatingest: anything (or anyone) that beats the competition

Chirk: cheerful

Picayune: used to signify something small or frivolous

Whip one’s weight in wild cats: to defeat or beat an opponent

Source: The Writer’s Guide to Everyday Life in the 1800s